Ailtirí na hAiséirghe

Tadhg Gaelach

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#2
They were a very interesting group. Quite close to the National Party today, I'd say, but much more specifically Gaelic. They would have been the in general Blue Shirt side of life - not the West Brit big farmers to be sure, but the Pro-Treaty IRA that believed in Collins and believed that the Free State was just a stepping stone to a united and Gaelic Ireland.
 

SwordOfStCatherine

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#4
They were a very interesting group. Quite close to the National Party today, I'd say, but much more specifically Gaelic. They would have been the in general Blue Shirt side of life - not the West Brit big farmers to be sure, but the Pro-Treaty IRA that believed in Collins and believed that the Free State was just a stepping stone to a united and Gaelic Ireland.
I don't think so- firstly I don't think it is true that they were generally from the Blue Shirt side of life though they had such people in them, they also had sympathizers and supporters who were from a hard line Republican side of things. There was a lot of positive about them- for instance they had the same attitude to the Irish language that you do. It was an extremely important thing to them. I would respect that and give them credit for that.
 

Tadhg Gaelach

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#5
It certainly is lovely to see those crowds of Irish faces - rather than the mongrel mobs we see today everywhere.
 

Tadhg Gaelach

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#6
I don't think so- firstly I don't think it is true that they were generally from the Blue Shirt side of life though they had such people in them, they also had sympathizers and supporters who were from a hard line Republican side of things. There was a lot of positive about them- for instance they had the same attitude to the Irish language that you do. It was an extremely important thing to them. I would respect that and give them credit for that.

Oh, I'd certainly regard them as a very positive movement. My point was they were were mobilizing people from the Pro-Treaty side of the fence to rise up against what the Free State had become. They were supported by Ernest Blythe and Oliver J. Flanagan and others who would have been Fine Gael or very Fine Gael minded. About the same time, Clann na Poblachta was mobilizing the Left Wing of the Republican Movement that had become stagnant during the 1930s and 40s. And, ironically, it was Clann na Poblachta that went into coalition with Fine Gael in 1948 and put Dev out of office.
 
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#7
They were a very interesting group. Quite close to the National Party today, I'd say, but much more specifically Gaelic. They would have been the in general Blue Shirt side of life - not the West Brit big farmers to be sure, but the Pro-Treaty IRA that believed in Collins and believed that the Free State was just a stepping stone to a united and Gaelic Ireland.
They were very anti partitionist. That would suggest they were more akin to FF than FG. Though presumably they were much more doctrinaire than FF
 

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#8
Oh, I'd certainly regard them as a very positive movement. My point was they were were mobilizing people from the Pro-Treaty side of the fence to rise up against what the Free State had become. They were supported by Ernest Blythe and Oliver J. Flanagan and others who would have been Fine Gael or very Fine Gael minded. About the same time, Clann na Poblachta was mobilizing the Left Wing of the Republican Movement that had become stagnant during the 1930s and 40s. And, ironically, it was Clann na Poblachta that went into coalition with Fine Gael in 1948 and put Dev out of office.
Most of them went into Clann na Poblachta. They did stay neutral about the Civil War, which if they had asked my advise I would tell to do so, but that doesn't seem that they were hard line FG types. Clann na Poblachta slashed it's own throat by going into coalition with FG- they could have become one of the main parties in the ROI if it wasn't for that.
 

Tadhg Gaelach

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#10
They were very anti partitionist. That would suggest they were more akin to FF than FG. Though presumably they were much more doctrinaire than FF

The thing about Fine Gael is that it had a strong anti-partition and strong Gaelic wing right up until the 1970s. Once things really kicked off in the north that side of Fine Gael live went very much underground. But it is a fact that Provisional IRA volunteers were welcome in many Fine Gael homes up and down the country right through the conflict.
 
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#11
The thing about Fine Gael is that it had a strong anti-partition and strong Gaelic wing right up until the 1970s. Once things really kicked off in the north that side of Fine Gael live went very much underground. But it is a fact that Provisional IRA volunteers were welcome in many Fine Gael homes up and down the country right through the conflict.
I had not known that. That side of FG really went dormant after the troubles began.
 

Tadhg Gaelach

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#12
They weren't interested in the Commonwealth and wanted a conventional armed invasion of the six, lol. Suffice to say their outlook wasn't blueshirt.

We need to hide this thread from AngloOftenWrong, that poor critter will have an aneurysm, lol.

Well, the Blueshirts had ambitions to invade the six counties if the opportunity presented itself. You have to remember that Pro-Treaty IRA veterans would have regarded themselves as staunch Republicans who were just carrying on the struggle by other means - and they were probably a lot more genuine about that than Adams & Co. today.
 
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