• Before posting anything about the COVID-19 virus, please read this first Click Here

6 April 1917: The USA declared War on Imperial Germany OTD.

Myles O'Reilly

PI Member
PI Member
Feb 3, 2017
13,775
15,630

Max the Axe

PI Member
Feb 19, 2021
694
880
Are you referring to Catalpa Sir?
The French Army performed admirably in World War One. Very innovative but after the Armistice, they slumbered until superior Wehrmacht tactics over ran them when the European Civil War turned hot again. Regurgitating Anglophonic propaganda and passing it off as historical analysis is the reddest of red flags.
 

Willow

PI Member
Oct 12, 2016
830
1,865
The Germans are due another Trimming Again Now = = Uppity Fuckers ! !
No need. They are ok with the invasion of their homeland by barbarian hordes, and have stopped reproducing anyway because babies are bad for the environment. I believe a Green chancellor is very real prospect, they are that gone in the collective head. The rest is mathematical certainty.
 

Clarke-Connolly

PI Member
Jun 7, 2020
10,446
13,493
No need. They are ok with the invasion of their homeland by barbarian hordes, and have stopped reproducing anyway because babies are bad for the environment. I believe a Green chancellor is very real prospect, they are that gone in the collective head. The rest is mathematical certainty.
It’ll be no fun without some one giving the Germans a Trimming ! !
 
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #18
OP
Catalpa

Catalpa

PI Member
Sep 4, 2018
5,739
11,561
French Army in World War One. The French performed adsmirably, contrary to what the Yankee loving Brit would have you believe. They actually invented Blitzkrieg which Johnny Kraut later adopted and developed

The 'Blitzkrieg' was developed by the Wehrmacht in the early days of WWII

Though elements of it were to be seen in the latter stages of WWI in the German, French and Commonwealth armies and to a lesser extent by the AEF on the Western Front.

Success has many fathers

- but Failure is an orphan...
 
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #19
OP
Catalpa

Catalpa

PI Member
Sep 4, 2018
5,739
11,561
They shoudl have joined the Central powers instead.
They should have invaded Canada instead as per "war plan red", American foreign policy should shave been focused on the monroe doctrine, manifest destiny and the 3C's Canada, Caribbean and central America.
They could have seized Canada all the Caribbean and large tracts of central american(panama) and the guineas and expelled France, UK and the Dutch out of North America. A single Nation from Panama to the Arctic with two Oceans walls on each side.

This is not History

The Study of History is to establish what happened in History

- not what should have happened in History.
 

Max the Axe

PI Member
Feb 19, 2021
694
880
The French Army performed admirably in World War One. Very innovative but after the Armistice, they slumbered until superior Wehrmacht tactics over ran them when the European Civil War turned hot again. Regurgitating Anglophonic propaganda and passing it off as historical analysis is the reddest of red flags.
Blitzkrieg
During the war, officers such as Willy Rohr developed tactics to restore manoeuvre on the battlefield. Specialist light infantry (Stosstruppen, "storm troops") were to exploit weak spots to make gaps for larger infantry units to advance with heavier weapons and exploit the success, leaving isolated strong points to troops following up. Infiltration tactics were combined with short hurricane artillery bombardments using massed artillery, devised by Colonel Georg Bruchmüller. Attacks relied on speed and surprise rather than on weight of numbers. These tactics met with great success in Operation Michael, the spring offensive of 1918 and restored temporarily the war of movement, once the Allied trench system had been overrun. The German armies pushed on towards Amiens and then Paris, coming within 120 kilometres (75 mi) before supply deficiencies and Allied reinforcements halted the advance.[30]

France​

Norman Stone detects early blitzkrieg operations in offensives by the French generals Charles Mangin and Marie-Eugène Debeney in 1918.[e] However, French doctrine in the interwar years became defence-oriented. Colonel Charles de Gaulle advocated concentration of armour and aeroplanes. His opinions appeared in his book Vers l'Armée de métier (Towards the Professional Army, 1933). Like von Seeckt, de Gaulle concluded that France could no longer maintain the huge armies of conscripts and reservists which had fought World War I, and he sought to use tanks, mechanised forces and aircraft to allow a smaller number of highly trained soldiers to have greater impact in battle. His views little endeared him to the French high command, but are claimed by some[who?] to have influenced Heinz Guderian.[50]
 

parentheses

PI Member
Oct 30, 2015
2,684
5,737
By early 1917 Russia was on the verge of Revolution, the French army was in a bad way and mutinies would break out, and Britain was on the verge of bankruptcy.

The Allies could not have continued the war in 1917 without an intervention by America.
 
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #22
OP
Catalpa

Catalpa

PI Member
Sep 4, 2018
5,739
11,561
Blitzkrieg
During the war, officers such as Willy Rohr developed tactics to restore manoeuvre on the battlefield. Specialist light infantry (Stosstruppen, "storm troops") were to exploit weak spots to make gaps for larger infantry units to advance with heavier weapons and exploit the success, leaving isolated strong points to troops following up. Infiltration tactics were combined with short hurricane artillery bombardments using massed artillery, devised by Colonel Georg Bruchmüller. Attacks relied on speed and surprise rather than on weight of numbers. These tactics met with great success in Operation Michael, the spring offensive of 1918 and restored temporarily the war of movement, once the Allied trench system had been overrun. The German armies pushed on towards Amiens and then Paris, coming within 120 kilometres (75 mi) before supply deficiencies and Allied reinforcements halted the advance.[30]

France​

Norman Stone detects early blitzkrieg operations in offensives by the French generals Charles Mangin and Marie-Eugène Debeney in 1918.[e] However, French doctrine in the interwar years became defence-oriented. Colonel Charles de Gaulle advocated concentration of armour and aeroplanes. His opinions appeared in his book Vers l'Armée de métier (Towards the Professional Army, 1933). Like von Seeckt, de Gaulle concluded that France could no longer maintain the huge armies of conscripts and reservists which had fought World War I, and he sought to use tanks, mechanised forces and aircraft to allow a smaller number of highly trained soldiers to have greater impact in battle. His views little endeared him to the French high command, but are claimed by some[who?] to have influenced Heinz Guderian.[50]

I could have told you all this for free 50 years ago....
 
Top Bottom